Let’s get healthier food into Chicago schools

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March 24, 2010 at 3:53 pm

It’s highly sad as we discuss the merits of great food — organic or local or even in our own gardens — that the future of tomorrow is eating donuts and Pop-Tarts for breakfast — at school.

For those who haven’t read the horrifying details of the Chicago Public Schools menu issues, you should read this story in the Chicago Tribune. They say they will phase out the donuts and Pop-Tarts, and cut back on the daily nacho service in the high schools as well.

But there is still a lot to be reformed in removing the bad and improving the good. This is an improvement, but there is so much more to be done.

As much as we claim to treasure our children, we feed them with pennies each day at school, and we get what we pay for. If Jamie Oliver wants to improve our school lunches like he did in England, be our guest.

Our children are worth it, aren’t they?

(For a longer take on this issue, I invite you to read my story on my home blog, BalanceofFood.com).

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One Comment

  1. Chad,

    Yes, this problem is a terrible one especially for kids in at risk communities who may get their only “real” food from schools. How can people make a difference.

    Speak up for more money for school lunch. I often tell people who ask me about school lunches. Chartwells, the CPS’ school lunch provider, is not the devil, but they don’t get enough money from the federal government. Read up on the various bills to update the Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act at Community Food Security Coalition http://www.foodsecurity.org/ and then call your Senator or your Represenative. You can also support Healthy Schools Campaign, an advocacy organization headquartered in Illinois, in a myriad of ways. Finally, Purple Asparagus is also organizing a group of parents that are trying to effect change in their own Chicago public schools (CPS is one giant district). We hope that these individualized efforts will trickle down to the other schools which lack such strong parent advocates.

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