Toil, Toil, Boil and Bubble: Burdock – The Witch’s Root

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Posted: February 28, 2010 at 11:04 pm

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I usually don’t like to include involved, elaborate recipes on this site, ones with a lot of steps or unusual ingredients. I make an exception when I make something so good out of an ingredient that is as ugly as it is difficult to tame. So when I created a delicious dish out of the ugliest root in existence, I thought it was worth sharing.

Even the word, burdock, conjures images of witches over a cauldron stirring potions that will turn their enemies into scaly, slimy beasts. It doesn’t help that it looks like a utensil to be used for this purpose.

Research on the root doesn’t present any more of an appealing image. Burdock is a biennial thistle whose dark green leaves can grow up to 18-inches in length. The edible portion, i.e. the roots, is food for the larva of the Ghost Moth and other Lepidoptera, such as The Gothic, Lime-speck Pug and Scalloped Hazel according to Wikipedia. Over at Botanical.com, Mrs. M. Grieve calls its taste “sweetish and mucilaginous.”

There’s little surprise, that burdock, which had been referred to in several of Shakespeare’s plays, has fallen out of fashion in European cultures in recent centuries. Burdock does remain popular in Japan, where it is known as gobo, and has experienced a slight resurgence of popularity in western cuisine because of macrobiotics, which recommends its consumption. For the rest of us, burdock remains a relative unknown. It’s grown locally and available at Whole Foods and occasionally through Fresh Picks from Harmony Valley in Wisconsin. Raw, burdock has a slightly bitter taste, which can be softened by soaking in cold water for 5 to 10 minutes prior to cooking. It also is best thinly shaved either by an adjustable vegetable slicer or with a vegetable peeler. The appearance of shaved burdock, a little like linguine, was the inspiration for the following recipe:

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Mushroom Braised Burdock with Soba Noodles, Mushrooms & Fresh Ricotta
Serves 2 as an entrée or 4 as an appetizer

This recipe has such an earthy quality to it because of the combination of the burdock, mushrooms & buckwheat of the noodles. It can easily be converted to a vegan recipe by substituting the butter for oil and omitting the ricotta cheese.

4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 pound button mushrooms, sliced ¼-inch thick
4 burdock stalks
2 cups mushroom stock, recipe follows
2 shallots
¼ cup Madeira
2 tablespoons finely chopped Italian parsley
1 teaspoon finely chopped rosemary
¼ pound soba noodles
¼ cup fresh ricotta

Melt 2 tablespoons of butter in a sauté pan over medium heat until melted. Add ½ of the sliced mushrooms and increase the heat to medium-high. Cook until lightly browned and remove to a bowl. Repeat with remaining butter and mushrooms. Turn the heat under the mushrooms to medium heat, add previously cooked mushrooms, add Madeira, bring to a simmer and reduce slightly. Turn the heat off. Fill a medium shallow bowl with cold water. Scrub clean or peel the burdock root. Shave it with a vegetable peeler, dropping the shaved pieces into the cold water. There will be some waste. Bring a large stock pot full of water to a boil. In a medium saucepan, bring the mushroom stock to a vigorous simmer. Add burdock and cook until tender, approximately 10 minutes. Salt the boiling water and drop the soba noodles in; cook for 6-7 minutes. In the meantime, add the burdock and stock to the mushrooms and reduce the liquid until almost evaporated. Taste for seasoning and add kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste. Drain the noodles, add to the mushroom mixture and toss to coat. Serve in shallow bowls topped with clouds of ricotta.

Mushroom Stock

Stems from 2 pounds of mushrooms
¼ cup dried porcini mushrooms
1 sprig thyme

METHOD: Cover the ingredients with 2 inches water in a medium sauce pan. Bring the water to a simmer and cook for 1 hour.




STAY TUNED: Rumor Has It That Left Foot Charley Wines Coming To Chicago

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Posted: February 28, 2010 at 11:37 am

Left Foot Charley wines feature locally grown grapes

The excellent Left Foot Charley white wines may be distributed soon in Chicago. Left Foot Charley is the creation of winemaker Bryan Ulbrich, who is passionate about bottling white wines produced from locally grown grapes that are suitable to the climate of Northern Michigan. If you’ve ever tried his Dry Riesling or Pinot Blanc, you will be surprised at their similarity to Alsatian whites of the same type. Ulbrich sources his grapes from preferred local growers “who love wine, relish in a challenge, and own parcels of land well suited to raising vines.”

The Local Beet will keep you posted on its distribution here in Chicago, but in the meantime, you can taste Left Foot Charley wines at their tasting room in Traverse City, Michigan, or a little closer in, at Everyday People Café in Douglas, Michigan, Lambrecht’s Wine, Spirits & Beer in St. Joseph, Michigan, D&W Fresh Market locations and GB Russo & Son grocers in Grand Rapids, Michigan.




MARKET WATCH: New Markets on the Horizon

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Posted: February 26, 2010 at 8:36 pm

My market radar has detected between 15-20 new (or potential) summer farmers markets so far in Illinois, many of them in the greater Chicago area.  Regular readers of the Beet have been following the progress of Morton Grove’s efforts.   A few others that have come to my attention include Norwood Park, Glenwood Sunday Market (Rogers Park), Bolingbrook, Homer Glen, Lockport, Yorktown Mall (Lombard), Lincoln Square (Thurs. night), Woodridge, Forest Park, and Bridgeport.  A few others will remain nameless, as they are not fully baked yet.  Another 30-40 markets were added last season statewide; a few didn’t get off the ground, and a few existing markets fell by the wayside.  But the number of markets is definitely on the rise.  What do you make of this?  What are their specific motivations?  If they build it, will you come? 

And why do I keep track of these comings and goings?  About two years ago, a small group of, well, groupies got together with a view toward forming a statewide farmers market association in Illinois.  The others, much more experienced than I in the realm of farmers markets (I had just completed my first season of winter farmers markets) each took on a number of tasks and I, with my winter market season behind me, offered to put together a list of farmers markets in Illinois with contact information.  

Over the course of about six weeks, I combed through a wide variety of online farmers market lists, kept my ear to the ground, checked Local Harvest daily for new entries, Googled, phoned, verified, updated, and came up with what I believed (and still believe) is a near-complete list of farmers markets in the state.  It was used—and continues to be used—to notify farmers market managers of workshops and forums about farmers market management.  (The association is still in formation, and its purpose and viability will be discussed—along with lots of information useful to new or experienced market managers—at a Chicago-area Forum (more info below)  being held March 13 in conjunction with FamilyFarmed EXPO. ) 

Though I no longer proactively update and verify the information on the list, my ears still perk up when I hear of a new or potential market and I update the list as new data falls in my lap.  It’s an imperfect system, especially when undertaken passively, but I’m always interested in hearing about new markets added to the scene.  

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This is a good weekend for indoor winter farmers markets:

  • Green City Market, Saturday 8 to 1pm, at the Notebaert Museum
  • Geneva Community Market, Saturday 9 to 1, at Inglenook Pantry in Geneva
  • Portage Park Farmers Market, Saturday 10 to 2, at Portage Park fieldhouse near Central Ave & Irving Park Rd
  • Empty Bottle Farmers Market, Saturday 12 to 5, at the Empty Bottle, corner of Western Ave & Cortez
  • Logan Square Farmers Market,  Sunday, 10 to 2, at the Congress Theatre on Milwaukee Ave

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Here are the specifics for the Farmers Market Forum:

Saturday, March 13, 2010  (pre-registration until March 10)
1:00pm – 4:00 pm  (see agenda below)
UIC Forum — University of Illinois at Chicago
725 West Roosevelt Road

For Farmers Market Managers & Vendors!
    – Network and Share successful marketing and outreach initiatives
    – Learn the latest news about GAP training
    – Find new ways for Growing Your Market ( including EBT/Link)
    – Farmers Market Association planning update
    – Continue to check back at this link for continued updated training information

Registration (Chicago Only)
$25 per person if you pre-register by March 10, 2010  ($30 per person at the door)
Register at Brown Paper Tickets

AGENDA
1:00 p.m.   Welcome / Farmers Market Association Planning Update
1:15 p.m.  Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Update
2:15 p.m.   EBT/Link for Farmers Markets – How to Make it work for You!
3:30 p.m. Small Group Breakouts (Identify future training priorities, share market strategies, identify grant opportunities, association planning)
4:00 p.m.  Wrap up – Groups report back

This Forum is being held in conjunction with the FamilyFarmed EXPO, a 3-day gathering of Chicago-area fans of locally grown and responsibly produced food and artisanal goods.  Your registration cost includes entry to Saturday’s Local Food Festival at the EXPO, which features cooking demos from farmer/exhibitors, celebrity chefs, educational seminars and an interactive Kids Corner.




Lusciously Local Layers

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Posted: February 25, 2010 at 10:25 pm


Yes, I know, I’ve just posted a picture of an empty pan, a very white, clean pan. Certainly, a picture that looks neither luscious nor layered.

But for a little while on Saturday evening, this was filled with luscious, layers of fresh pasta, homemade ricotta, and ground grassfed beef coated with a creamy sauce made from Tomato Mountain roasted tomatoes. This largely local lasagna was our contribution to a regular gathering of friends. While I brought my camera, I wasn’t quick enough to snap a shot before it was largely gone. For a moment, I considered shooting the sole remaining piece, but the lonely layers were wrapped and the pan washed before I got around to pulling the camera out.

It was not so popular with the kindergarten set. While Thor liked it, it couldn’t compare with the promise of playtime with his best school friend. No matter, it left more for the big kids.

Lasagna

3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 medium onions cut into ½-inch dice
4 medium garlic cloves, minced
1 pound ground beef
1 teaspoon kosher salt
¾ cup dry red wine
42-ounces whole, peeled tomatoes, pureed in a blender
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1 pinch red pepper
1 bay leaf
½ teaspoon balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons heavy cream
2 grinds of black pepper
1 pound fresh lasagna noodles (if so inclined to make your own here’s the recipe for fresh pasta)
1 ½ pound ricotta
½ cup grated parmesan cheese
1 large egg
1 teaspoon salt
¼ cup sparkling water
1 tablespoons chives, finely chopped
1 teaspoon fresh oregano, finely chopped
1 tablespoon basil, finely chopped
1/3 cup grated mozzarella

Heat the olive oil in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Add onions and sauté until translucent. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add beef and salt; cook until no longer pink. Add wine and bring the liquid to a boil, cook for 1 minute. Add tomatoes, oregano, red pepper and bay leaf and cook uncovered for a half hour or until slightly thickened. Add balsamic vinegar and cook for 1 minute. Stir in cream and pepper and remove from the heat.

In a large bowl, mix together ricotta, parmesan cheese, egg, sparkling water, and herbs.

Preheat oven to 350º F. Grease a 9 by 13-inch baking pan with olive oil. Spread a quarter of the sauce on to the bottom of the pan. Layer a quarter of the noodles on top of the sauce. Drop 1/3 of the filling in gobs of of the filling onto the noodles. Repeat two more times, end with remaining noodles and sauce. Sprinkle with mozzarella. Put into the prepared pan cut side down. Bake for about an hour or until the cheese on top is bubbling and golden. Remove from the oven and let set for ten minutes.




Meet the Beet @ the FamilyFarmed Expo – 3/13

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Posted: February 25, 2010 at 9:50 am

As if.

As if you need more reasons to attend “consumer day” at the FamilyFarmed Expo on March 13, 2010 at the UIC Forum, between the chef demo’s by the like of Rick Bayless, Paul Virant, Paul Kahn, the whole animal discussion with our friends Mike Sula and Rob Levitt, the exhibits, the wide array of speakers, we bring you another opportunity to meet the Beet.  Melissa Graham, the Sustainable Cook, is one of the speakers, attesting to the fact that eating local can be a year-round activity.  In addition, as in past years with her crew from Purple Asparagus, she will be leading the family activities.  Local Beet contributor, Helen Standen, the Chicken Lady, is presenting on her area of expertise, the back yard coop.  Myself, I’m on a panel exhorting you all to buy local, buy organic and buy fair trade.  Look forward also to some reporting on the Expo from our Backyard Farmer, Brad Moldofsky.  And I am sure you’ll find out what’s happening behind the scenes via our Twitter feeds @thelocalbeet @localfamily or @sustainablecook.  Meet the Beet at the Expo.

The full line-up for consumer day can be found here (note, I have been moved from the eating on a dime to the buying local, organic and fair trade).




Hey, Wisconsin, Fight For Your Right To Drink Raw Milk

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Posted: February 23, 2010 at 10:30 am

We need people – hundreds – no – thousands of people from around the State – to show up at both of these Public Hearings in support of the Raw Milk Bill.   These are History Making events!

This is it folks – the time to be heard!

It has been noted that for each person that appears in person, the committee looks upon each one as 10 votes.

If we have any chance at all of getting this bill to pass, we must convince these two committees that YOU want it. Numbers speak!  We are asking everyone to gather friends, family, neighbors, etc., to attend these hearings.

Wisconsin raw milk bill, as introduced in the Senate on December 21, 2009 (LRB-3242/3) as SB 434.  Referred to Committee on Agriculture and Higher Education.

Public Hearing
Wednesday, March 10, 2010

10:00 am
Chippewa Valley Technical College
Room 106/Auditorium
620 West Clairemont Ave
Eau Claire, WI 54701

Wisconsin raw milk bill, as introduced in the Assembly on December 18, 2009 (LRB-3961/1) as AB 628.  Referred to Committee on Rural Economic Development.

Public Hearing
Tuesday, March 16, 2010
Wisconsin State Capitol Building
Madison
10:00 am
Room 417 North




Cheatin’ With Salad/Inventory Update

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Posted: February 23, 2010 at 9:27 am

One of the easiest ways the Local Family gets around its local eating requirements is to eat out.  Of course, when we eat out, we prefer eating at places like Carnivale and Mado that source their foods about the same way we source our foods.  We cannot always eat that way.  Sometimes we want to eat at one of our favorite ethnic restaurants, like the Jamaican place around the corner from us.  Other times we are celebrating a Bar Mitzvah with friends at Maggiano’s.  We do have some limits though, and we easily passed up the platters of asparagus at Maggiano’s.  On the other hand, I took three helpings of salad.  I probably ate more salad than anyone else at the party.  Man did I enjoy that salad.

Not that long ago, I was having lunch with Local Beet co-founder Morowitz.  He was saying how spoiled he was from local foods, so spoiled that even supermarket salads tasted awful.  And about that time, I had a similar experience of eating some Costco lettuces that tasted like styrofoam.  Shipped in salad can be bad.  Still, what’s the saying, a little dressing never hurt anyone and a bit more dressing covers a lot of sins.  I’ve said before, my appreciation for salads is probably more an appreciation for salad dressings.  I’ll take some non-local salad thank your very much.

I guess I wanted Maggiano’s salad too because we just have not had any green salads in the Bungalow in ages.  Not since an Irv and Shelly order early in 2010.  It’s been a few things keep salad away.  We have not had much chance to winter market.  Last Saturday’s bar mitzvah was the last in a string of about six.  If not that, it seems we are at the food pantry.  Or if we are at a winter market, it has not been one with locally grown lettuces.  The last three winters of eating local, we have found many bags of hoop house greens to use.  Not yet this winter. 

On a non-salad related note, I asked my daughter the other day if she actually ate the many daikons I’ve been giving her.  “They give me a nice tingle in my throat when I burp,” she replied in a way that I knew she actually eats the veg.  Besides daikon, we’ve used some more of our potatoes in Shepard’s pie and baked, as a vehicle for leftover sloppy joes.  We seem to have a never ending pile of cooked cabbage done up with ginger and dried cranberries.  We also found a bag of brussels sprouts we forgot about that looks still edible.  The updated inventory is below.
 

Basement Storage

  • Winter Squash – acorn, carnival (2), spaghetti, pie pumpkin, butternut (2), blue triamble (2), Australian butter, galeux d eysines, big ass orange – Update: the big ass orange squash actually in the dining room was getting a little soft, so it was pureed and froze for future use.  Used a spaghetti squash that dates back to 2008 for a casserole but have a 2008 spaghetti squash left
  • Red onions – 25 lb bag, untouched + 3 or so loose  – Update: Used several more sprouted onions from the bag
  • White onions – 6 or so, about 1 lb
  • Canned tomatoes – whole, sauce, puree
  • Spiced peaches
  • Peach chutney
  • Dried mushrooms
  • Misc. pickles, jams, jellies, relishes
  • Dried beans
  • Local oats

Basement Fridge

  • Cauliflower
  • Leeks (5)
  • Daikon (2) – Update: now upstairs for easy lunch use
  • Red cabbage (3) – one very tired
  • Kohlrabi (5) - 1 very large, 4 small
  • Cranberries – 4 1 lb packages
  • Turnips (15) – assorted
  • Carrots (30) – assorted – Update: used some in lunches, some in shepard’s pie
  • Beauty heart radishes

Basement Freezer

  • Frozen fruits – blueberries, grapes, cherries, peaches
  • Frozen veg – peas, corn, greens, pureed squash, tomato puree, dried tomato
  • Local meat – Update: used two, two pound packages of ground beef for shepard’s pie, sloppy joes

Kitchen Fridge

  • Leek
  • Jalepenos (6) -
  • Daikon (2)
  • Parsley root (2)
  • Turnip
  • Homemade quince-apple membrillo
  • Local eggs
  • Carrots
  • Slagel ham – Update: Making much use, in spaghetti squash casserole, with cheese grits and local fried egg, strata, lunches
  • Assorted cheeses
  • Smoked trout
  • Brussels sprouts

 

Kitchen

  • Garlic (5)
  • Black walnuts
  • Dried fruits – strawberries, apricots, peaches

 

Root Cellar in the Sky

  • Apples – 25 lbs – Including Northern spy, red delicious, yellow delicious, winesap, honeycrisp, mutsu, gala, granny smith - Update: Still eating some, throwing rotten ones away
  • Potatoes – 40 lbs – 20 lbs or russet or related, 5 lbs yukon gold, fingerlings, all-blue — no reds oddly enough – Update: used russets for baking, yukon gold for shepard’s pie
  • Sweet potatoes – 1 lb
  • Rutabaga (7) – Update: Used one for shepard’s pie
  • Turnips (15)
  • Beets (10) -
  • Carrots – 5 lbs
  • Chestnuts – 1 lb
  • Sunchokes - 8 lbs -
  • 25 lb of local corn meal
  • 5 lb local buckwheat



Another Two Sign Up

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Posted: February 22, 2010 at 4:31 pm

Two more farms just submitted their applications to join the Morton Grove Farmers’ Market. One of them ordered a two-booth-wide booth! We’re planning to visit a Morton Grove dairy vendor on Thursday to film production and tape the company’s president talking about her firm and what it’s like to sell directly to consumers. We’re drafting a letter to submit to the neighbors of the parking lot where we will reside to make sure they understand what’s going on and have a chance to offer their input before the first market (May 29). Things are moving along nicely.




Starting a New Market

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Posted: February 19, 2010 at 5:10 pm

I’m reading The New Farmers’ Market by Vance Corum, Marcie Rosenzweig and Eric Gibson, and the first thing it’s taught me is that we were correct in putting an apostrophe after the “s” in Farmers when naming ourselves the Morton Grove Farmers’ Market. So far so good.

The woman who lent me the book, Kristina Otte, is our manager and visioneering founder. She is the Kevin Costner character in this Field of Dreams concept: “If we build a farmers’ market near Waukegan and Dempster, they will come buy local produce.” All the more apt, I suppose, because Kristina is from the cornfields of Iowa.

We’ve just about booked every Saturday morning with musical entertainment and a sponsor for our Community Connections table. While only a few vendors have submitted their checks, at least a dozen more are in the process of filling out the application form. A specialty organic produce vendor in town asked us what he should start growing in his greenhouses in anticipation of the market. Kristina and I discussed it, and we wouldn’t dare recommend to a farmer what he ought to plant, as we cannot guarantee him that it will sell. While Morton Grove enjoys a diverse population who probably have a variety of vegetable preferences, we can’t be sure everybody will show up. I’d hate for this guy to bring 10 lbs. of pesticide-free daikon radishes that he grew on his land in Indiana only to watch them rot in the Morton Grove sunshine. Still, I’m excited by the prospect of him being there, bringing a unique batch of greens that ensures he won’t compete with our other produce vendors, who will be selling more mundane–yet wholesome–goods.

It’s a little intimidating to think that this whole enterprise will be opening in just a few months. But we’ve gotten so much cooperation from the village, vendors like Kappy’s Restaurant (they’re donating 10% of your bill Wednesday nights in March if you mention the market) and the volunteers on the committee that everything is falling into place nicely. There are a lot of people in town who really really want this to happen, and it’s encouraging to note that we’ve encountered very little resistance from private and public organizations. Which means there are no horror stories to report. So far, we’ve been fortunate, and I’m really looking forward to meeting our vendors and providing a welcoming place to greet members of our community in late May.




Have a Heart With This Local Calendar – UPDATED X 3

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Posted: February 19, 2010 at 10:05 am

There is no end to good causes that the Local Beet loves, and our area Calendar is filled with benefits for Slow Food Chicago, Land Connection, Growing Home, Seventh Generation Ahead, and a few weeks hence, the Localicious party with FamilyFarmed.  Can you also find space in your Calendar for West Suburban PADs annual dinner, Have-a-Heart.  What say does West Suburban PADs have to do with local food?  Well, the Local Family have for a long time, been involved with addressing the insidious problem of homelessness.  Way back in his college days, Local Dad spent overnights playing spades at a Washington DC shelter.  These days, his volunteerism pales next to the Local Mom.  If Dad pitches in occasionally as a “site captain”, Mom is there every month.  More, Mom sits on the Board of PADs and for several years chaired their Shelter Committee.  Still, we want some local food connection for you, and we have it.  About our two favorite restaurants in the world, Mado and Vie stepped up with generous donations for the silent auction at the benefit.  Come see if you can out bid me for these certificates.  And you know my other favorite restaurant, Freddy’s in Cicero, they stepped up with not one, not two, not three but five certificates for $25′s worth of pizza.  You know we can share those bids.  If you have the opportunity, please come on February 27, 2010 to show your support for West Suburban PADs at the Hyatt Lodge on the McDonald’s Campus is Oak Brook.

UPDATE: Need even one more reason to attend this Saturday’s benefit for West Suburban PADS?  Our friends at Carnivale have also donated a gift certificate for you to bid on during the silent auction. 

UPDATE II: Several winter markets this weekend, so you have no excuses for not eating local.  As in the past, we warn that you need a reservation to attend the Green City Market’s Chef demo’s.  You especially want to reserve this weekend because the Local Beet’s Sustainable Cook, Melissa Graham is one of the presenters.  On the other hand, you do not need to reserve to participate in the letter writing activities organized by Green City and Slow Food Chicago for better school lunches.

UPDATE III: The butchering classes at Mado have been filling up quicker than orders for their cassoulet.  They’ve just announced dates for March.  Sign up now!

Our updated Local Calendar is below.

WHAT TO BUY NOW

Use our new Market Watch to see what will be at the markets.

We see some  local apples still, but mostly of the (less than) Delicious variety–did you know that there is no relationship between Red Delicious and Yellow Delicious apples.  The brand new, very supermarket-y Caputo’s at Grand and Harlem has Michigan apples still.  We also see local potatoes there and at other places.

Think there’s no other local foods?  A good way to gauge what can be out there is to look at Irv and Shelly’s Freshpicks site.  Local items include  beets, celery root,  micro-greens/sprouts,  mushrooms, rutabagas, lettuces,  and cabbage.

From indoor growers like Windy City Harvest, you might also find rocket, collards and chard.   We bet you might spy a sunchoke.

The Produce Express stand at the Chicago French Market still have  has Illinois grown, indoor tomatoes as well as local potatoes and squash.

When there is no fresh fruit around, there is still fruits dried and frozen.  Tomato Mountain and River Valley Ranch offer canned local goods.

Let us know what other local goods you are still seeing for sale.

 WHERE TO FIND LOCAL FOODS

These stores specialize in local foods:

As noted above, local apples and potatoes can be had for excellent prices.  Look soon for an update on what’s local at  the French Market at Metra Market. Until then here’s our previous report.

WHAT TO DO

MARKETS  AND EVENTS THIS WEEK

Wednesday - February 24

Check out the Hideout for Soup and Bread – 1354 W. Wabansia, Chicago – 530 – 8 PM

Chicago’s Downtown Farmstand market, presented in partnership with Edible Chicago, will present a Culinary Conversation with author, educator and farmer Terra Brockman discussing her new book with Judith Dunbar-Hines of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs on February 24 at 6:00 PM at the Downtown Farmstand. Come join us and plan to attend exciting event! Event is free but reservations are required.

Saturday – February 27

New! – Have-a-Heart benefit dinner for West Suburban PADs – The Hyatt Lodge at McDonald’s Campus, 2815 Jorie Boulevard, Oak Brook, IL

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is “Meat and Potatoes”

Portage Park – Irving Park and Central, Chicago - 10 – 2 PM

Empty Bottle – 1035 N. Western, Chicago – 11 – 5PM

Geneva Community Winter Market – 11 N. 5th Street, Geneva – 9 AM – 1 PM

Sunday – February 28

Logan Square Farmers Market – 2135 N. Milwaukee, Chicago – 10 – 2 PM

Tuesday - March 2

reThinking Soup at UICs Hull House – 12 noon – 800 S. Halsted, Chicago

Wednesday - March 3

Check out the Hideout for Soup and Bread – 1354 W. Wabansia, Chicago – 530 – 8 PM

MARKETS AND EVENTS COMING

Saturday – March 6

Geneva Community Winter Market – 11 N. 5th Street, Geneva – 9 AM – 1 PM

Sunday – March 7

Winter Market, St. Giles Church – 1025 Colombian, Oak Park – Times not posted

Logan Square Farmers Market – 2135 N. Milwaukee, Chicago – 10 – 2 PM

Wednesday – March 10

New! – Two friends of the Local Beet, Chef Rick Gresh and rare tea sourcer Rodrick Markus are teaming up for a meal combining their two talents.  David Burke’s Primehouse may be a steakhouse to you, but to us it is also a place very much in line with our eat local ethos.  If you like good food and rare teas, this is a great event to try both. 

Thursday - March 11

Family Farmed Expo – Financing Farm to Fork Conference - UIC Forum, Chicago

Friday - March 12

Family Farmed Expo – Trade Conference – UIC Forum, Chicago

Localious Party with FamilyFarmed – UIC Forum, Chicag0 – 7 – 10PM

Chicago Food Policy Summit - UIC Forum, Chicago

Saturday – March 13

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is “Greens, Eggs and Ham”

Family Farmed Expo – Consumer Day – UIC Forum, Chicago

Sunday – March 14

Winter Market, Park Ridge Community Church, 100 Courtland, Park Ridge – 930 AM - 130 PM

New!Pig Butchering class at Mado – 1230 PM – 1647 N. Milwaukee, Chicago

Tuesday - March 16

New!City Provisions Supper Club with August Hill Winery at Logan Square Kitchen – 2333 N. Milwaukee, Chicago   

Wednesday – March 17

Wisconsin vs. the World – Cheese Contest - Monona Terrace – Madison, Wisconsin 6-8 PM

New!Crawford Farm dinner at Vie – 4471 Lawn Ave, Western Springs, IL

Saturday – March 20

Ebenezer Luthern Church – 1650, W. Foster, Chicago – 9 AM – 1 PM

Sunday – March 21

Unitarian Universalist Church of Elgin – 39W830 Highland, Elgin – 1 – 3 PM

Monday - March 22

New!Pig Butchering class at Mado – 1230 PM – 1647 N. Milwaukee, Chicago

Saturday – March 27

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is still Greens, Eggs, and Ham (we think).

Portage Park – Irving Park and Central, Chicago - 10 – 2 PM

Saturday - April 10

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is Cheese

Saturday – April 24

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is Cheese.

Portage Park – Irving Park and Central, Chicago - 10 – 2 PM

 




It Tastes Localicious

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Posted: February 19, 2010 at 9:11 am

I’m always paraphrasing Upton Sinclair when I talk about talking about the benefits of eating local.  I say I aim for the head but hit them in the stomach.  In other words, who needs reasons why to eat local when you can taste for yourself.  And to taste for yourself, who needs a better reason than to attend FamilyFarmed’s annual Localious party.  I could tell you all the reasons why you should support FamilyFarmed such as their recent successes bringing local foods to public schools, but you will want to go just for the good time.  Our roaming chef friend Alan “Jazzfood” Lake has gathered an interesting and diverse group of sweet, savory and boozy local restaurants to fill you up, March 12 2010 at the UIC Forum.  Alan has been especially concerned that their be enough bars and bartenders, so you’ll have to wait little for your locavore cocktails.

Those cocktails will include spirits made nearby in Wisconsin by our friends at Death’s Door and expertly mixed by Brad Bolt of Bar deville.  The food to enable your drinking ranges from the authentic Chinese flavors of Lao Sze Chuan to the cloudscraping cuisine of Local Beet contributor Pat Sheerin.  What Lao Sze Chuan is to real Chinese cuisine, Pasticceria Natalina is to Southern Italian pastries.   Save room for the cake.  The current line-up of Localicious partnicpants can be found here.

On March 12, find out why the best reason to eat local is that it’s Localicious.

The UIC Forum is located at the corner of Halsted and W. Roosevelt.  The address is 725 West Roosevelt Road, Chicago, IL 60607.




The Market Watch – A Winter Farmer’s Market Primer

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Posted: February 18, 2010 at 6:11 pm

Editor’s note: We are please to have co-opted the hardest working woman in local markets, Robin “Winter” Schirmer.    Robin calls herself a ”farmers market groupie,” and we are pleased to have her as part of the Local Beet.  Robin has seen lots of farmers markets from all three sides:  as manager/coordinator, as market seller, and as a consumer.  In the past three winter seasons, she has coordinated over 50 one-time, indoor farmers markets in church venues all over the Chicago area.  For the last year, she has worked with Tomato Mountain Farm, boosting their Chicago-area farmers market presence from 6 to over 20 markets last summer, staffing them and selling at most of them at one time or another.  With the Market Watch, she will provide readers of the Local Beet a expert view of our markets.  She’s a great resource for us all.  Feel free to draw upon her knowledge.

winter market 1The Editor has been after me for ages to give a market recap after each of the Winter Farmers Markets  that I coordinate.   With fewer markets to coordinate this year (10 markets down from 29 last season), I can actually take a breath and fill you in.  

For those of you not familiar with these particular markets, let me digress.  The Winter Farmers Markets are the primary project of Churches’ Center for Land and People (CCLP), an interfaith organization centered in Southern Wisconsin that grew out of the farm crisis in the 1980s to assist farmers in Wisconsin, Illinois and Iowa.  But specifically, the markets were the brainchild of Tony Ends of Scotch Hill Farm, director of CCLP for the last 6 or 7 years.  Tony is a real visionary; he initiated these markets in all three states to provide venues for small farmers to sell their winter-able produce and value-added farmstead products beyond the growing season.  As a working farmer himself, Tony knows all too well that many farmers depend on off-season, temporary jobs and/or a working spouse to make ends meet.  Starting 6 years ago with just a handful of markets in each state, sometimes with just 3 or 4 vendors, the Winter Farmers Markets grew to become, at least in the Chicago area, a movable feast of markets, usually with 10 to 20 vendors and a wide variety of farm products.

Market_OverviewFrom their start as a means to help small farmers and their rural communities, they have become a welcome and reliable source of off-season produce and farm goods to a loyal and growing following.  The markets are grower/producer-only, but small-batch, artisan foodmakers (bakers, ice cream, etc.) who locally-source at least 25% of their ingredients are also allowed to participate.  In addition, you’ll find a few fair trade items and offerings from other not-for-profits and recyclers .

With Tony’s departure this summer as director of CCLP, the Winter Farmers Markets in the Chicago area have been co-sponsored this season by CCLP and Faith In Place, a Chicago-area interreligious organization working with local faith communities on environmental issues, and took a step back to a more realistic schedule.  That coincided with other markets and venues stepping up to add markets to their schedule, creating a steady patchwork of indoor markets:  Logan Square Farmers Market and Geneva Community Market (weekly), Portage Park Farmers Markets (monthly), Green City Market (bi-monthly), and a handful of churches flying solo with one-time markets.  Check out the Local Calendar for an up-to-date list of these markets.winter market 2

That brings us to the present–and very recent past.  Last Saturday’s market at Euclid Avenue United Methodist Church in Oak Park was a season high in sales for several of the regular vendors.  And the market a few weeks earlier in Old Irving Park was a previous high for some.   That’s what floats my boat, but I’m sure that inquiring minds want to know, What was available?  

  • Grass-fed and grain-fed beef, pastured pork and poultry and eggs (Arnolds Farm);
  • Apples and cider (Hardin Orchard);
  • Grass-fed lamb and wool-stuffed mattress toppers and comforters (Kinkoona Farm);
  • Fresh mushrooms, pickled veggies, sauces, salsas, dips and spreads, and NEW! portabello ravioli and butternut squash ravioli (River Valley Kitchens);
  • Alpaca and wool yarns,  felting kits, and goats’ milk soap (Whimsical Acres);
  • Spa and beauty products made from homegrown herbs (Natural Beauty by Margie);
  • Salsas, preserves, soup, pasta sauce, Bloody Mary mix, and more (Tomato Mountain Farm);
  • Fair trade coffee and chocolate (Equal Exchange)
  • Baguettes, croissants, tarts, sourdough breads, etc. (Bread from the Heart, Fraternite Notre Dame)
  • Butter Mountain multi-colored potatoes, AquaRanch tilapia and basil vinaigrette, Plapp organic whole wheat flour, and more, at a catch-all table hosted by Jacqueline of Bread from the Heart.

This weekend’s market, Saturday, February 20, 9am to 1pm, at United Church of Rogers Park, 1545 W Morse Ave, Chicago 60626, will have most of that and much, much more: 

Several vendors will also have information and signup sheets for their summer CSAs.

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Now, I don’t intend for Market Watch to focus entirely on “my” Winter Farmers Markets, but it seemed as good a place to start as any.  I hope you’ll turn to Market Watch to learn what’s coming to markets and what new markets are coming, and use the comments to let Beet-Land know about a new market you’d like to get on the radar, or to let us know of your own experiences at a market—the good, the bad, and the ugly—but please keep the comments constructive, not destructive.   When you’re tempted to complain (Where’s the fresh lettuce?—in February) remember that there’s someone working behind the scenes to bring you the best market experience possible under the circumstances of our limited growing season.


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What CSA Are You?

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Posted: February 18, 2010 at 3:43 pm

Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA, is a program in which individuals advance a farm some of the costs it will incur during the growing season by buying a share of the projected crop in the beginning of the season.  The upfront share paid by the individual often covers the cost of seeds, equipment and labor.  In return, shareholders receive a portion of the farm’s bounty later in the season.  Usually, the shareholders receive a weekly box of vegetables and fruit; the amount they receive depends upon how much they paid upfront.  In other words, the risks are shared, and so are the rewards. 

In Chicago, we are fortunate that there are many CSAs available to us.  What you might not know is that – beyond the vegetables – CSAs are as diverse as we are.  Which CSA suits you best?  Let us help.  Are you a/an:

Iron Chef Aficionado?  Simply Wisconsin delivers to Vie in Western Springs, the restaurant of Iron Chef contender and locavore, Paul Virant.  Pick up your share and you might run into Chef Virant.  Who knows?  Maybe he’ll have recipe suggestions.

Homebody?  Wellhausen Farm makes home deliveries if you live along their delivery route.  Irv & Shelly’s Fresh Picks also offers home delivery for a fee.

Community Activist?  Growing Home is a Chicago-based CSA that sources its vegetables and herbs from urban farms.  Proceeds from its CSA support a transitional job program for homeless and low income individuals.  Triple A Farms, owned by second-generation farmers in the DeGroot family, will give you a free share if you establish a sustainability program at your work.  They will even deliver to your work if at least 10 people signup for shares.

Knitter?  Videnovich Farms and Bumblebee Acres Farm both offer fiber (wool, fleece, etc.), made from sheep’s wool sourced from their farms.

Yogi/Yogini?  Jai Kellum of King’s Hill Farm offers intensive, multi-day workshops and single yoga classes at the farm, which provides a “natural and holistic setting.”

Florist in the making?  Scotch Hill Farm, Dea Dia Organics, Fat Blossom Farm, and Freedom Organix offer shares of flower CSAs.  If you sign up for a CSA flower share, in most cases, you will receive a bouquet every week.

History Buff?  Walkup Heritage Farm & Gardens, located in Crystal Lake, Illinois, dates back to 1856.  The Walkups were some of the first settlers of McHenry county, and the farm continues to be operated by family member Michael Walkup.  As Walkup only offers CSAs that are picked up at the farm, you are treated to a bit of history every time you pick up your share.

Small eater?  Eat out a lot?   If you don’t cook or eat much, a biweekly share may be just the thing for you.  By purchasing a biweekly share, you have two weeks, instead of the usual one, to consume the contents of your farm box before another arrives.  If so, Broad Branch Farm, Dea Dia Organics, Gibbs Family Garden, Green Earth Institute, King’s Hill Farm, Simply Wisconsin, Tempel Farms Organics and Wellhausen Farm are good options for you.

Hard-core vegetarian?  Genesis Growers offers the longest CSA program of the bunch – 9 months.  Angelic Organics, a longtime CSA, offers ¾ bushel boxes bursting with vegetables (and the occasional melon or two) on a weekly basis.  With all of these vegetables to consume, you will have plenty to eat for the duration of the CSA (and longer if you cold-store and preserve your vegetables).

Commitment-phobe?  Erehwon Farm offers a two-week trial.  Fat Blossom Farm offers “flex shares,” which may be bought on a weekly basis instead of for the whole growing season.  Growing Power permits you to place orders weekly.

 

Carnivore?  Cedar Valley Farm, Grass Is Greener Gardens, and Liberty Family Farm are CSAs that specialize in sustainably-raised meat. 

Omnivore?  Broad Branch Farm, Bumblebee Acres Farm, and Harvest Moon Organics offer both vegetable and meat CSAs.

Certifiably crazy about organic foods?  Crème de la Crop, Green Earth Institute, Growing Home, Harvest Moon Organics, New Era Farm, Sandhill Organics, Radical Root Farm, and Sweet Earth Organic Farm are all certified organic.

Farmer-in-training?  King’s Hill Farm in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, offers a trade membership for those who will perform four hours of work per farm box.  At Peasant’s Plot, in Manteno, Illinois, eight hours of labor per month during the growing season will net you a weekly bag of organic vegetables.  If you’re willing to put in eight hours per week in the field or at the market for twenty weeks during the growing season, Dea Dia Organics, in Grayslake, Illinois, will pay you with a weekly farm box. 

Horse Lover?  Tempel Farms Organics breeds and trains Lipizzan horses, which were featured in the Presidential Inaugural Parade last year.

 Dog Lover?  Green Earth Farm, in Richmond, Illinois, offers pet boarding facilities.  The owners of Bumblebee Acres, in Harvard, Illinois, breed AKC Shetland Sheep and Havanese dogs, as well as kittens, rabbits and guinea pigs.

Epicurean?  Crème de la Crop, Earth and Skye Farm, and Walkup Heritage Farm all specialize in heirloom varieties of fruit and vegetables.

Artisan Soap Shopper?  M’s Organic Farm, in Woodstock, Illinois, produces their own “farm-crafted” artisan soaps and herbal care products, made from ingredients grown on the farm. 

So, if you’re flexible or have the choice of more than one CSA in your area, you might want to consider selecting a CSA that offers additional benefits – or reflects your lifestyle — and you may find yourself even more rewarded throughout the growing season.

Details on all the CSAs mentioned can be found in our 2010 CSA Guide.


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The Cookbook Addict Strikes Again

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Posted: February 17, 2010 at 10:45 am

For those obsessively following the Local Family, you know that the Local Beet has been in negotiations longer than health care reform with the maternal member of the family to begin posting under the byline, “Cookbook Addict.”  Some day soon, not in the spirit of the Year in Local collection that never came but more along the lines of the Anniversary special edition that will come out, the Cookbook Addict will share information from her vast collection of materials.  When she does take to the Internets, knowing my wife, she will present herself as a humble addict.  What will come across is not so much my wife’s cookbook addiction, but her addiction to being included in helping out.  We’re talking a woman who’s motto fit neatly on a mug we saw a few days ago, “stop me before I volunteer again.”  She would never relate this.

Yes, she would, must, admit to a collection of cookbooks that exceeds the physical limitations of the bungalow.  They exist in pretty much every room, including both bathrooms, the basement and even our root cellar in the sky.  You might be fooled into thinking all of these books are simply a design element for the house.  Oh, what mess?  We meant it that way.  The books all serve a purpose.  They are her reference library.  Before she goes fourth and cooks tzimmes for 150, she consults the twelve or so Jewish, I mean Jewish holiday books she owns for insights (the fuller collection of Jewish cookbooks includes Sephardic, Jewish-Italian AND Jewish-Sicilian, Jewish-Indian, Israeli, etc.).  Other times, within her vast collections, she finds that one recipe.  Oh how she does that I have no idea.

I mean the other day, I was walking through the kitchen.  I noticed a book still open, one probably not in your collection, A Midwest Gardener’s Cookbook by Mariane K. Towne.  Something I can tell from the jacket that she picked up for a bargain ($4.98).  She had found in this book, a recipe using like exactly what she needed to use.  A recipe using spaghetti squash, ham and frozen peas, plus cheese.  Because in our basement lay a spaghetti squash actually from last season yet very much usable with a slight edit.  In our fridge a large hunk of Slagel ham that a friend just reminded us that we still owe her money for, and in our freezer the many peas she insists on buying when the price is right.  And she baked it all up in a casserole that had none of the blandness that spaghetti squash is prone.   The Cookbook Addict had struck again.




Plant a Seedling with the Newest Local Calendar

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Posted: February 15, 2010 at 9:59 pm

Peter Klein of Seedling Fruits speaks Tuesday, February 16  at re-Thinking Soup at Hull House.  We heard that the house filled up last week for Tracey Vowells, so get there early for soup and discussion.

Did you reserved yet for Terra Brockman and Judith Dunbar-Hines of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs at Chicago’s Downtown Farmstand on February 24, 6 PM at the.  Additional information and a link to register can be found here.

WHAT TO BUY NOW

We see some  local apples still, but mostly of the (less than) Delicious variety–did you know that there is no relationship between Red Delicious and Yellow Delicious apples.  We also see local potatoes.

Think there’s no other local foods?  A good way to gauge what can be out there is to look at Irv and Shelly’s Freshpicks site.  Local items include  beets, squash,  micro-greens/sprouts,  mushrooms, rutabagas, lettuces,  and cabbage.

From indoor growers like Windy City Harvest, you might also find rocket, collards and chard.   We bet you might spy a sunchoke.

The Produce Express stand at the Chicago French Market still have  has Illinois grown, indoor tomatoes as well as local potatoes and squash.

When there is no fresh fruit around, there is still fruits dried and frozen.  Tomato Mountain and River Valley Ranch offer canned local goods.

Let us know what other local goods you are still seeing for sale.

 WHERE TO FIND LOCAL FOODS

These stores specialize in local foods:

As noted above, local apples and potatoes can be had for excellent prices.  Look soon for an update on what’s local at  the French Market at Metra Market. Until then here’s our previous report.

WHAT TO DO

MARKETS  AND EVENTS THIS WEEK

Tuesday – February 16

re-Thinking Soup with Peter Klein - Hull House – University of Illinois, Chicago – 800 S. Halsted, Chicago – 12 – 1 PM

Wednesday - February 10

Chicagoist brings the soup at the Hideout for Soup and Bread – 1354 W. Wabansia, Chicago – 530 – 8 PM

Saturday – February 20

Winter Market, United Church of Rogers Park – 1545 W. Morse, Chicago - 9 AM – 1 PM

Geneva Community Winter Market – 11 N. 5th Street, Geneva – 9 AM – 1 PM

Sunday – February 21

Logan Square Farmers Market – 2135 N. Milwaukee, Chicago – 10 – 2 PM

Organic Cultivation of Backyard Apple Trees – Slow Food City’s Edge - The Historic Clow House @ 10S404 Knoch Knolls Road Naperville, Illinois – 2 PM

MARKETS AND EVENTS COMING

Tuesday - February 23

Update!City Provisions Supper Club with North Shore Distillery – City Provisions – 1816 W. Wilson, Chicago – 630 PM

Wednesday – February 24

Chicago’s Downtown Farmstand market, presented in partnership with Edible Chicago, will present a Culinary Conversation with author, educator and farmer Terra Brockman discussing her new book with Judith Dunbar-Hines of the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs on February 24 at 6:00 PM at the Downtown Farmstand. Come join us and plan to attend exciting event! Event is free but reservations are required.

Saturday – February 27

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is “Meat and Potatoes”

Portage Park – Irving Park and Central, Chicago - 10 – 2 PM

Empty Bottle – 1035 N. Western, Chicago – 11 – 5PM

Geneva Community Winter Market – 11 N. 5th Street, Geneva – 9 AM – 1 PM

Sunday – February 28

Logan Square Farmers Market – 2135 N. Milwaukee, Chicago – 10 – 2 PM

Saturday – March 6

Geneva Community Winter Market – 11 N. 5th Street, Geneva – 9 AM – 1 PM

Sunday – March 7

Winter Market, St. Giles Church – 1025 Colombian, Oak Park – Times not posted

Logan Square Farmers Market – 2135 N. Milwaukee, Chicago – 10 – 2 PM

Thursday - March 11

Family Farmed Expo – Financing Farm to Fork Conference - UIC Forum, Chicago

Friday - March 12

Family Farmed Expo – Trade Conference – UIC Forum, Chicago

Localious Party with FamilyFarmed – UIC Forum, Chicag0 – 7 – 10PM

Chicago Food Policy Summit - UIC Forum, Chicago

Saturday – March 13

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is “Greens, Eggs and Ham”

Family Farmed Expo – Consumer Day – UIC Forum, Chicago

Sunday – March 14

Winter Market, Park Ridge Community Church, 100 Courtland, Park Ridge – 930 AM - 130 PM

Tuesday - March 16

New!City Provisions Supper Club with August Hill Winery at Logan Square Kitchen – 2333 N. Milwaukee, Chicago   

Wednesday – March 17

Wisconsin vs. the World – Cheese Contest - Monona Terrace – Madison, Wisconsin 6-8 PM

Saturday – March 20

Ebenezer Luthern Church – 1650, W. Foster, Chicago – 9 AM – 1 PM

Sunday – March 20

Unitarian Universalist Church of Elgin – 39W830 Highland, Elgin – 1 – 3 PM

Saturday – March 27

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is still Greens, Eggs, and Ham (we think).

Portage Park – Irving Park and Central, Chicago - 10 – 2 PM

Saturday - April 10

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is Cheese

Saturday – April 24

Chicago Green City Market at the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m (Directions) – The theme is Cheese.

Portage Park – Irving Park and Central, Chicago - 10 – 2 PM

NO DATES ANNOUNCED

St. Benedict Parish-Northcenter

First Evangelical Free Church-Andersonville

Keep you eye on Local Beet as we have all your winter needs covered.

 




C & D Pastured Pork For Sale Monday, February 15th, 2010
Continuous Improvement – CSA Materials Monday, February 15th, 2010
Have We Got a CSA for You Friday, February 12th, 2010
Share Your CSA Decisions Friday, February 12th, 2010
2010 CSAs by Location Friday, February 12th, 2010
2010 CSA Guide Thursday, February 11th, 2010
Assistant Farmer Position Open Wednesday, February 10th, 2010
Organic Farming Conference in February Wednesday, February 10th, 2010
Not Keeping an Eye on the Prize(s) Wednesday, February 10th, 2010
Progress at the MG Market Tuesday, February 9th, 2010
World’s Best Brewery? It’s Local. Tuesday, February 9th, 2010
Tracey Tuesday, Reservations Saturday, Other Limited Events – Local Calendar Tuesday, February 9th, 2010
It Gets Worse – Kitchen Chicago Food Destroyed Tuesday, February 9th, 2010
Farmers’ Market Gets Help from Kappy’s Sunday, February 7th, 2010
A Bitter Fruit: A Child’s Plea to the City Sunday, February 7th, 2010
Local Fruit Destroyed Friday, February 5th, 2010
On Being an A** at Revolution Brewing Friday, February 5th, 2010
A Puff of Air Thursday, February 4th, 2010
The Year of Daikon, Mushy Veg Thursday, February 4th, 2010
Cold Weather Recipe File Thursday, February 4th, 2010
Less on the Local Calendar Wednesday, February 3rd, 2010
Vie Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010
Eat Local Old Vegetables – UPDATED Tuesday, February 2nd, 2010
Later, Tater Monday, February 1st, 2010